• Heit neurointerventional research lab

    Stanford University

  • Our vision

    Our research seeks to advance our understanding of cerebrovascular disease and to develop new minimally invasive treatments for these diseases. We study ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral aneurysms, delayed cerebral ischemia, cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), dural arteriovenous fistulae, and other vascular diseases of the brain. We use state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques to non-invasively study these diseases, and we are developing future endovascular technologies to advance neurointerventional surgery.

    Basic and Translational Science Research

    From bench top...

    Our basic and translational scientific team is working to advance our understanding of cerebrovascular development and patterning, the genetic basis of cerebrovascular malformation and aneurysm pathogenesis, and cellular adaption to cerebral ischemia. Our current knowledge about cerebrovascular development in humans is meager and limits our ability to develop new, molecularly targeted treatments for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. New knowledge about cerebrovascular development could generate new, molecularly targeted treatments for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes and transform clinical paradigms for these diseases.

    Clinical Research

    ...to bedside.

    Our clinical research team seeks to advance our understanding of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke pathophysiology and improve the non-invasive imaging evaluation and endovascular treatment of these diseases. In addition, we are working to identify circulating biomarkers of acute and subacute cerebral ischemia to identify patients at risk of stroke before it happens.

  • The team

    Our team comes from a variety of different backgrounds and has a wide range of expertise.

    Jeremy J. Heit, MD, PhD

    Principal Investigator

    Dr. Heit is an Assistant Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at Stanford University.

     

    His interest in research was piqued as an undergraduate student at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he was a member of Tom Cech's lab. He completed his MD and PhD degrees at Stanford University, an internal medicine internship at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, a radiology residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, and a neurointerventional radiology fellowship at Stanford. He has been an attending neurointerventional surgeon and physician scientist at Stanford since 2015.

     

    https://profiles.stanford.edu/jeremy-heit

    Eric Sussman, MD

    Neurointerventional Fellow, Neurosurgery Resident and Research Associate

    Dr. Sussman is a Neurointerventional Surgery Fellow at Stanford and a Research Associate in the Heit Lab. Dr. Sussman completed his undergraduate degree at Duke University and his MD at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. He is also a current neurosurgery resident at Stanford. Dr. Sussman's research is focused on the identification of factors that predict clinical outcomes following ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke as well as neurovascular proteomics and metabolomics.

     

    https://dura.stanford.edu/residents/eric-sussman.html

    Dylan Wolman, MD

    Radiology Resident and Research Associate

    Dr. Wolman is currently a Radiology Resident at Stanford and a Research Associate in the Heit Lab. Dr. Wolman completed his undergraduate degree at

    Brandeis University and his MD at Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Wolman will begin his Neurointerventional Surgery Fellowship at Stanford in 2020 after completion of his radiology residency. Dr. Wolman's research focuses on novel imaging techniques, such as dual energy CT and perfusion imaging, for the evaluation of acute ischemic stroke.

     

    https://profiles.stanford.edu/dylan-wolman

    Tobias Faizy, MD

    Postdoctoral Research Scholar

    Dr. Faizy is a neuroradiology consultant and board certified radiologist from Hamburg, Germany. His interest in research first aroused during his time in the anaesthesiology lab at the University of Essen, where he was working on proteasome research related with sepsis and left ventricular failure. He completed his MD at the University of Göttingen and Essen and his PhD at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Besides working on the development of advanced quantitative MRI techniques for neuroimaging, his current research interests include stroke imaging, stroke outcome prediction, and vascular imaging in patients with acute stroke.

     

    He recently joined Dr. Jeremy Heit´s lab at Stanford University as a research scholar.

    Reza Kabiri, BS

    Visiting Research Associate

    Mr. Kabiri is a MD PhD student in Hamburg, Germany, who is a visit research associate at Stanford University and a member of the Heit Lab. His research interests include stroke imaging, artificial intelligence, and advance imaging of cerebral ischemia.

    David Marcellus, BS

    Clinical Research Coordinator

    Mr. Marcellus is a Clinical Research Coordinator at Stanford University and a member of the Heit Lab. He graduated from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and joined Heit Lab as a Research Associate. After one year, he transitioned to a Clinical Research Coordinator, where he currently works running the clinical research efforts of the Heit Lab and other studies. Mr. Marcellus's research studies imaging and clinical factors that predict stroke patient treatment eligibility and outcome.

  • News and press

    Congratulations to Dr. Sussman for being awarded the competitive Joe Niekro Foundation Research...
    Read more...
    Congratulations to Dr. Wolman for being awarded the prestigious RSNA Research Resident Grant for...
    Read more...
    More Posts
  • Publications

    Selected publications from the Heit Lab

    Rapid Neurologic Improvement Predicts Favorable Outcome 90 Days After Thrombectomy in the DEFUSE 3 Study

    Heit JJ, et al. (2019) Stroke. May;50(5):1172-1177. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.119.024928

    Collateral blood flow measurement with intravoxel incoherent motion perfusion imaging in hyperacute brain stroke.

    Federau C, et al. (2019) Neurology. May 21;92(21):e2462-e2471. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000007538

    Hypoperfusion Intensity Ratio Is Correlated With Patient Eligibility for Thrombectomy.

    Guenego A, et al. (2019) Stroke. Apr;50(4):917-922. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.118.024134

    Comprehensive List of Dr. Heit's Publications

    Pubmed Bibliography

  • join the heit lab team

    Submit a CV and a brief description of your research interests and career goals to Jeremy Heit, MD, PhD at jheit@stanford.edu

    Post Doctoral Candidates - Basic/Translational Science Research Group

    We are looking for qualified post doctoral candidates to join our group. Applicants to the basic science/translational research team should have an interest in advancing our understanding of cerebrovascular developmental biology and patterning, ischemic stroke physiologic imaging and treatment in animal models, nano-therapeutic treatment of ischemic stroke or delayed cerebral ischemia after cerebral aneurysm rupture, or novel interests pertinent to the field of neurointerventional surgery. Candidates must hold a PhD or MD from an accredited institution and have excellent laboratory and analytical skills. Independence and critical thinking are highly valued skills.

    Post Doctoral Candidates - Clinical Science Research Group

    We are looking for qualified post doctoral candidates to join our group. Applicants to the clinical research team should have an interest in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke pathophysiology and the non-invasive imaging evaluation and endovascular treatment of these diseases. We are particularly interested in how the brain adapts to cerebral ischemia to maintain neurologic function in the setting of severe cerebral blood flow compromise. Candidates must hold a PhD or MD from an accredited institution and have excellent analytic skills. Computational, programming, independence, and critical thinking are highly valued skills.

    Research Associate - Clinical or Basic/Translational Science Research Groups

    Looking to gain research experience or learn more about cerebrovascular disease and its cutting-edge treatment? We are looking for qualified research associate candidates to join our group. Applicants should have a Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution and an interest in cerebrovascular disease. Candidates with an interest in pursuing clinical medicine or research are encouraged to apply. Independence, and critical thinking are highly valued skills.

  • Support Our Research

     

    A gift to the Heit Lab will support our cerebrovascular disease and neurointerventional treatment research.


    If you would like to make a donation for this purpose, please contact:

    Erik C. Rausch

    Stanford Medical Center Development

    Phone: 650-725-1005

    Email: erausch@stanford.edu

    Online gifts can also be made here: https://medicalgiving.stanford.edu

  • Contact us

    Jeremy J. Heit, MD, PhD

    Department of Radiology

    Neuroimaging and Neurointervention Section

    300 Pasteur Drive, Room S047

    Stanford, CA 94305

    jheit@stanford.edu

    Jeremy J. Heit, MD, PhD Stanford Faculty Profile

    Dr. Heit's Stanford Faculty profile may be found at:

     

    https://profiles.stanford.edu/jeremy-heit

    Clinic

    Stanford Neuroscience Health Center

    213 Quarry Rd

    Palo Alto, CA 94304

    (650) 723-6469 (Clinical Appointments)

    All Posts
    ×